Editor’s Choice: Homebound After College: A Blessing in Disguise?

This week we highlight our editor’s top picks from Encourage and Teach.

By: Natalie Plumb

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“So where are you living now?”

“Same place as before.”

“Oh, you mean…”

“Yes, I’m still at my parents’ house.”

“Oh. [Insert quick change of subject].”

According to a Pew Research Center’s analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data, the percentage of young adults from age 18 to 31 who are living in their parents’ home is the highest it has been in four decades.

A few too many articles cite this statistic then proceed to explain why this is becoming a trend, offering precautions young adults should take to avoid a similar fate.

I won’t bore you by writing the same article.

While perhaps not the antithesis of that argument frequently cited, what I’m about to say may be about as antithetical as it gets.

I don’t think we should necessarily listen to the peer pressure—often from well-meaning people—that shouts “be the difference,” “don’t live at home after college,” or “declare your independence!”

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Independence is important. After a certain amount of time, kids should become grown-ups and cease dependence on parents for laundry and cooking. But, as drastic as it may feel, that short one-to-two-year transition between college life and employment is worth spending at home. It’s borderline advisable, and for a few reasons.

This post first appeared on Encourage and Teach on January 6, 2014. View the full text here.

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