Bishop Loverde: Expressing the love of Christ on the digital continent

By: Bishop Paul S. Loverde 

In the midst of World War II, Saint Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish Franciscan priest, wrote, “No one in the world can change Truth. What we can do and should do is to seek truth and to serve it when we have found it.”  

Saint Maximilian Kolbe

 

Saint Maximilian Kolbe was martyred in a concentration camp when he volunteered to take the place of a man to be executed. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1982. Saint Maximilian Kolbe’s resolute faith and resolve to communicate that faith even in the most desperate of circumstances gives us an example of hope for our own lives. While we do not face the same unimaginable trials, we ask for his intercession that we too may be given the grace to communicate the truth despite the presence of many obstacles in our society. 

For example, today, some media provide us with stumbling blocks to holiness. At times it may seem that we have nowhere to turn when looking for family-friendly resources. We are bombarded every day with immoral messages in the music to which we listen, the books we read, the television we watch and the advertising on the Web sites we visit. 

And yet, we are not to hide from the world, are we? No, we must make prudent choices about the media we consume and also play a role in producing quality content. It is vital for every Christian to take seriously his or her role in combating immoral messages with the antidote of truth through evangelization. In his message on the occasion of the 44th World Communications Day, our Holy Father tells us: “God’s loving care for all people in Christ must be expressed in the digital world … as something concrete, present and engaging.” 

Here in the Diocese of Arlington we strive to carry out the Holy Father’s directive through communicating the Good News of the Gospel and of the Church to parishioners and to secular society. This is accomplished via our Web site and on this blog, as well as on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and iTunes. We produce podcasts, videos, photo galleries and press releases. This past Lent, in partnership with the Archdiocese of Washington, many of you participated in The Light is On For You, a Lenten initiative which offered forgiveness and encouragement through the Sacrament of Penance to each of us who has been separated from God by sin. 

We have steadily seen the concrete fruits of our efforts in engaging the virtual world. Our Web site receives over 36,000 visits a month. Our Facebook page boasts more than 1,800 fans. Almost 1,000 people follow the Diocese on Twitter. As snowstorms pummeled Northern Virginia and Washington D.C. this past winter, many of you who were stranded in your homes by the inclement weather were able to tune into our televised mass

To maintain our presence in both the virtual and physical world, your support is needed. This weekend, June 12-13, as part of the nationwide Catholic Communications Campaign, we ask you to consider prayerfully your calling to financial stewardship. Your generous contributions will fund the local initiatives discussed above and national projects as well (such as Catholic radio and television), to ensure that Christ’s Word will be, as our Holy Father asks, “concrete, present and engaging” to all. 

 In the spirit of Saint Maximilian Kolbe, who triumphed over sin in receiving the crown of martyrdom, let us also resolve to work tirelessly to triumph over the poison of sin and the culture of death.

2 thoughts on “Bishop Loverde: Expressing the love of Christ on the digital continent

  1. We need this in our country Australia, and priests to stand up and tell us this. May the light come on in our hearts and land. Bless you all.

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